Ghosted – Rosie Walsh

Source: Goodreads

Sarah Mackey visits England every June in memoriam of the car crash she and her sister we involved in as teenagers. This year, as she wanders the hills alone, she meets a man named Eddie, and they have eight blissful days together before he leaves for a long-planned vacation and Sarah goes to London to visit friends. They promise to stay in touch. They’ve fallen in love, after all.
And then Eddie never calls. He doesn’t post online, he doesn’t show up for his futbol matches, and he seems to have vanished off the face of the earth entirely. But Sarah can’t help feeling that something is not quite right, and her search for Eddie is just the beginning thread in the unraveling of life as she knows it.


After hearing about this book on the No Thanks We’re Booked Podcast, I found out my roommate had gotten it from Book of the Month Club, so I swiped it. The first 150 pages were pretty slow, and I worried I just wasn’t into the book. BUT THEN. Page 151 blew my socks off. And everything was the best kind of twisty and complicated and mysterious after that. I didn’t see anything coming, and I was late to more than a few appointments I had last week because I just couldn’t put it down. I can’t even tell you any of the rest of the characters’ names because I would undoubtedly spoil something, but trust me: this is a good one.

HHC Rating: 4 Stars.

The Ordinary Princess – M. M. Kaye

Source: Goodreads

Princess Amy is the youngest of seven princesses, and her parents are sure she will be the most beautiful… until the court advisors insist that all of the local fairies should be invited to the christening, and then no one bothers to provide adequate transportation for the eldest fairy, Crustacea, and she gives Amy the gift of being ordinary. When her parents begin to despair and the court advisors begin to get desperate for her to marry, Amy decides to run away and live in the forest. The approaching winter pushes Amy to get a job as a kitchen maid in order to afford new clothes. Little does she know that the man-of-all-work she quickly befriends is really the young King Algernon, who is just as ordinary as she is!


This book holds a special place in my heart as the first story I have memories of reading all on my own. I’m sure there were others before it, probably the Little Golden Books versions of Cinderella and The Little Mermaid, maybe even some other beloved books, but I don’t remember reading them like I remember reading this. I remember loving it so much I immediately started it over from the beginning.

Amethyst (Who’s name I distinctly remember pronouncing as “Azmyth”) was ordinary, with mousy brown hair like my own, and she ran away and made a life for herself. She was never a princess that needed to be rescued. She fell in love the way normal people do, slowly, and she lived happily ever after with a gaggle of children and the love of her life.

This book showed me that there was magic to be found in the mundane, that you didn’t need to be “the chosen one” to have an adventure – that life was the adventure – and that everyone has their own path to take to get where they’re headed.

Princess Amy and Prince Perry’s story might be the one that started my writing. If someone like Amy could find adventure and love, then so could anyone. And if adventure was a possibility for anyone, than writing was possible for me. It gave me permission to be myself instead of the cookie-cutter images of perfect little girls I saw on television and in other books. I could pursue my interests, chase my curiosities, have my adventures, and still someday find love. I’m happy to say that since that day, at maybe 6 or 7 years old, I’ve never looked back. I’ve chased my dreams and let nothing hold me back. And I’d just like to thank Queen Amethyst Alexandra Augusta Araminta Adelaide Aurelia Anne (originally of Phantasmorania) and King Algernon (+7 more names, one of which is Peregrine) of Ambergelder for showing me that being myself was the best thing I could ever wish to be.


HHC Rating: 5 Stars.

An Offer From A Gentleman (Bridgerton, #3) – Julia Quinn

Source: Goodreads

Sophie Beckett knows she is a bastard, but she is thankful every day that her father still decided to raise her as his own. After a magical evening spent sneaking into a masquerade ball and falling head-over-heels for a man she’s just met, Sophie is found out and flees her stepmother’s home, seeking employment with a kind couple in the country.

Years later, Benedict Bridgerton has no idea that Sophie is the same masked woman he fell for. The one woman he must let go of if he is ever going to be happy in a marriage. As the gentleman he was raised to be, coming to Sophie’s rescue is as natural as breathing. As their love blossoms again, Benedict struggles with his feelings for Sophie and for the masked woman he cannot find. Sophie, on the other hand, just wants to get away from London and the spies of her stepmother at all costs. When Sophie falls into her stepmother’s clutches, will Benedict be able to save her? Or will both of his loves be lost to him forever?


This would be a Cinderella retelling if Cinderella ran away and decided to make it on her own. This book had me on the edge of my seat the entire ride. Sophie is refreshingly independent, even if it means braving the great unknown that is an extremely dangerous place for a young unmarried woman. Benedict is striving to find meaning in his life, all the while attempting to put the masked woman out of his mind, and Sophie out of his mind, and find a willing and suitable wife. As his insecurities rise to the surface and Sophie tries to slip away, the tension rises, and the Bridgertons visit a prison.

This book really solidified my love for Lady Whistledown, as well. The mysterious gossip writer gets into the nitty-gritty with her sources in this one and it never fails to amuse me as a reader.

HHC Rating: 5 Stars.

Other reviews in this series:
Book 1 – The Duke And I
Book 2 – The Viscount Who Loved Me
Book 4 – Romancing Mister Bridgerton
Book 5 – To Sir Phillip, With Love
Book 6 – When He Was Wicked
Book 7 – It’s In His Kiss
Book 8 – On The Way To The Wedding

Star Trek Watch Through Part 5: The Original Series – “Miri” and “Dagger of the Mind”


Original image via Wiki Media Commons

Welcome to part five of my Star Trek watch through! I had some downtime over the holidays and was able to get back on track with my watching habits. This post will cover The Original Series, Episodes #8 and #9, “Miri” and “Dagger of the Mind.” Other posts in this series can be found linked at the bottom, and the watch order can be found on the first post, here.

Episode #8 – “Miri”

Captain Kirk, Dr. McCoy, Spock, and Yeoman Rand beam down to a new Earth in what seems to be an exact replica of our solar system after they receive a distress signal. The planet seems to be halted sometime in the 1960s, and the crew only finds children alive. One of the older children, a girl named Miri, explains that the ‘grups’ (grown-ups) all contracted a disease, went crazy, and died. The crew of The Enterprise soon discover that the ‘disease’ was a failed attempt at immortality, and that it slows aging to a rate of 1 month of aging to every 100 years in children, but rapidly sends adults into a frenzy that ends in death. The children are the only survivors, and they will contract the ‘disease’ when they hit puberty. Before they are able to make this discovery, the oldest boy alive and defacto leader of the children, who call themselves ‘onlys’, leads a team to steal the crew’s communicators, so they have no contact with the ship or its computers to use in finding a cure. The crew begins contracting the disease after making contact with the children.

I think Cpt. Kirk is supposed to be attempting to manipulate Miri in order to get answers about the children, the planet, and the disease, but in all honesty, he just creepily hits on her for the entire episode, while also flirting with Yeoman Rand, which nearly turns Miri and the children against him. There wasn’t much, if any, plot movement in this episode aside from the actual search for a cure.

Episode #9 – “Dagger of the Mind”

The USS Enterprise is delivering supplies to the Tentalus Penal Colony when a Dr. Simon VanGelder, sneaks aboard and asks for asylum. Dr. McCoy asks Captain Kirk to perform a full investigation and Kirk beams down to the penal colony along with Dr. Helen Noelle, to act as his medical eyes and ears. Once on Tantalus, Cpt. Kirk and Dr. Noelle follow the lead penal doctor, Dr. Adams, through a full inspection of the facilities, including a Neural Neutralizer that Dr. Adams explains doesn’t work all that well, but none-the-less was the cause of Dr. VanGelder’s brain injuries.

Back on the ship, Dr. McCoy and Spock try to get some answers out of Dr. VanGelder, who seems to be in immense pain any time he tries to recall something of note. Spock attempts Vulcan Mind Reading on a human for the first time, whereupon they discover that Dr. Adams has been wiping peoples’ memories and filling them with his own ideas. After a struggle with Dr. Adams, Kirk is freed when Dr. Noelle electrocutes a guy and short circuits the security barrier, allowing Spock to beam down to the penal colony with a rescue team.


The two most notable things about this episode are, firstly, the past between Cpt. Kirk and Dr. Noelle, who apparently hit it off at a Christmas party. Kirk seems uncomfortable beaming down to the colony with her and tells Spock to pass a message to Dr. McCoy, that Dr. Noelle had better be the best damn assistant he’s ever had. I assume the feeling here was supposed to be that McCoy let Noelle go with Kirk because she liked him, but it came across as either she was way more interested in him than he was in her and couldn’t let it go, or that he has trouble keeping his hands off of her. Either way, it was icky. Made more so by Dr. Noelle attempting to ascertain if Kirk has feelings for her and Cpt. Kirk falling prey to mind control and then sexually assaulting Dr. Noelle. The over-sexualization of Dr. Noelle’s garb and that single loose lock of hair were all ridiculously over the top as well. That chunk of hair would get annoying fast. No woman would walk about without spare bobby pins in her pocket (do their uniforms have pockets?). And also if you’re a medic, why bother curly your hair like that all the time when a ponytail works so much better.

Secondly, the Neural Neutralizer, which is clearly a basic prototype from which we get the Neuralizers found in the Men In Black films. Flash someone and fill in the blank for their memory. Genius! Put it in all the things!

Overall, not a terrible episode, just the glaring sexualizations that really irked me. I don’t think I will ever get used to it.

Other Posts in This Series:
Star Trek – The Original Series: Season #1
Part 1: “The Cage” and “The Man Trap”
Part 2: “Charlie X” and “Where No Man Has Gone Before”
Part 3: “The Naked Time” and “The Enemy Within”
Part 4: “Mudd’s Women” and “What Little Girls Are Made Of”
Part 6: “The Corbomite Maneuver” and “The Menagerie, Part 1” (Coming Soon)

Slaughterhouse-Five – Kurt Vonnegut

Source: Goodreads

Slaughterhouse-Five is a lively, if strange, jaunt across time through Billy Pilgrim’s life. In the middle of World War II, Billy Pilgrim becomes unstuck in time. Although the rest of the world experiences Billy’s life linearly, Billy himself – his soul, if you will – hops around his own timeline. Sometimes he is in the forests of Germany, sometimes he is at his daughter’s wedding, sometimes he is on the alien planet of Tralfamador, and sometimes he is in his bunk inside Slaughterhouse Five just before the bombing of Dresden.


The overarching theme of this book seems to be the question of whether Billy is actually unstuck in time like he seems, or if he is suffering severe PTSD from the bombing of Dresden that makes him feel that way. The reader is never given an explicit answer. Whatever the actual reason for Billy’s obsession with the Tralfamadorians, there is no denying that this book is written in a confusing way. Billy even has a run-in with the author which just lends to the meta-filled non-plot.

I’ve been hearing about this book in school and in the book world for years, but I didn’t pick it up until a friend of a roommate recommended it based on what he saw on my shelves. I think I had a look of consternation on my face the entire time I was reading it, and ultimately I think I got exactly nothing out of it except for the fact that I can now say I’ve read it. If unreliable narrators are your jam than you might like it, but I can’t steer you in any particular direction regarding it.


HHC Rating: 2 Stars.