The Little Bookshop of Lonely Hearts (Lonely Hearts Bookshop, #1) – Annie Darling

Source: Goodreads

Posy Morland has always lived above Bookends Bookshop. She and her brother lived here before her parents passed away, and she came back from college to help raise her brother after they were gone. Their home is thrown into jeopardy when Posy’s landlady and boss, Lavinia, dies, leaving the bookshop to Posy and the rest of the property to her odious grandson, Sebastian. The two new owners go head-to-head over their beloved bookshop, desperate to keep it alive but at odds about the best way to do so.


I so wanted this book to be spectacular. The bookshop setting, the stellar love/hate chemistry between Posy and Sebastian was there, everything was there, but one thing was missing. Glaringly obvious to me as I neared the end of the story was the fact that we never got to know Sebastian at all. We almost never got chapters from his point of view, and when we did they focused on his actions and never delved into his thoughts or emotions. Because of this, Sebastian’s feelings felt as though they came out of the clear blue sky. The ending felt very rushed, like the author had hit word count and everything after that was just to wrap everything up. The best romances, in my opinion, allow you to get to now both your heroine and your hero, and not getting Sebastian’s view point really hurt the ending of this one. Overall it was cheerful and cute and an enjoyable read, but the ending really dented my feelings about it.

HHC Rating: 3.5 Stars.

Waiting for Tom Hanks – Kerry Winfrey

Source: Goodreads

Annie grew up obsessed with rom-coms. After her dad passed, she and her mom watched them religiously, and she went to school for screen writing to write her own – featuring Tom Hanks of course. But after school she came back to Ohio, where she has lived with her uncle since her mom’s passing, and she can’t seem to move on with her life. She’s waiting for her Tom Hanks, her perfect match, but she’s not out there looking for him. Instead she’s sitting in her best friend’s coffee shop working remotely doing freelance article writing for everything from cold sore creams to gardening rakes.

Everything changes when a famous romantic-comedy director announces he’s shooting his new movie in Annie’s hometown. Annie’s best friend insists it’s fate, and it truly seems it could be when she finds a sudden connection to the director and ends up working on set. But instead of learning the ropes in the hopes of creating her own movie someday, Annie finds herself the unwitting heroine in her own Tom-Hanks-esque love story.


I rarely pick up books that have just been published, because I am always too busy working my way through a massive backlist TBR. Waiting for Tom Hanks kept popping up on my radar, though, and I finally decided that I just had to read it. Cut to visiting 3-5 different indie bookstores before finally finding it at Target by accident. The million-and-one references to rom-coms, Nora Ephron, and Tom Hanks are delightful, so long as you are just as obsessed with rom-coms as Annie and actually get all of the references, because there are many. Annie’s uncle also runs a weekly Dungeons & Dragons game, which I absolutely love with a singular purity, and honestly Uncle Don is just so pure over all. He is easily my favorite.

Annie as a character was slightly annoying because she couldn’t see what was going on, but that’s how rom-coms go, aren’t they? There was hardly any diversity of any shape or form (which is also mostly on par for rom-coms, though it’s a huge problem of the genre), and the ending was definitely rushed – I could have used another 25-50 pages for better pacing, please! Also, there were almost no physical descriptions in the entire book – so maybe there’s a lot more diversity than we think? That’s probably a pipe dream, but oh well. Overall it was a very cute book that I will be passing along to many friends.

HHC Rating: 4.5 Stars.

Other Reviews in this series:
Book 2 – Not Like The Movies (Book available in 2020)

Fix Her Up (Hot and Hammered, #1) – Tessa Bailey

Source: Goodreads

Georgie Castle has always been invisible. As the pesky little sister left out of the family business, she’s found her own way in life, using her business degree to launch a small company doing children’s birthday parties. Only, the business is so small that it’s just her. Dressed up as a clown. But no matter how good she is at her job, it definitely doesn’t make her family take her anymore seriously than they ever have.

Travis Ford is back in town after a shoulder injury ended his shining baseball career prematurely. He’s drowning his sorrows in beer and take out until someone breaks into his apartment and starts throwing food at him. Literally. But is he really going to let his best friend’s kid sister tell him how to live his life? Heck no. What could Georgie know about life? She’s just a kid. The pesky little sister of his best friend, who came to all his games growing up and spied on him from a tree in her back yard.

As Travis begins to build a new life, he becomes increasingly aware of a few things.
1) Someone started a betting pool to see who the baseball playboy will date first.
2) His washed up fame has left him high and dry… and lonely.
And 3) Georgie is so not the kid he remembers from his school days.
Too bad she’s busy building her own life, determined to make her family take her seriously, and is treating him like the big brother he’s always been to her.

This book was exactly the distraction I needed, though had I known the title of the series I probably would have been better prepared. It started off super cute and then became quite, quite steamy, actually. I’ve since shoved it at multiple friends who are also enjoying themselves. We’ve been texting about it and it mainly ends up being heart emojis because we all love Georgie and Travis just so much. Not safe to read aloud at work, and also probably inappropriate for anyone under 18.

I will say that the whole ‘little sister’ trope is a bit overused, and Travis calling her “baby girl” and referring to her as his little sister all the time does make everything a little, well, awkward. Add in that Georgie is a literal birthday clown and Travis is obsessed with her being a virgin, and you have the ultimate awkward scene. But it still managed to somehow be cute. When it comes to contemporary romance, there’s always a lot of objectification, and Georgie and Travis both participate in this quite a lot, but it doesn’t overwhelm the story. This was a light, quick read, with some very steamy (and somewhat awkward, I’ll be honest. It’s very step-by-step rather than overall-emotion) scenes. I’ve never read any of Bailey’s books before, so I’ll have to check out a few more before I can say for sure that this is her normal style, but it was a fun summer beach read!

HHC Rating: 3.5 Stars.

Other books in this series:
Book 2 – Love Her or Lose Her (Expected Publication 2020)



Heart of Iron (Heart of Iron, #1) – Ashley Poston

Source: Goodreads

Ana and Di were found floating in an escape pod seven years ago, with no memories of what came before. They’ve built their own family out of Captain Siege’s misfit pirate crew, beings from all parts of the galaxy, ravaged by plague and run out by oppression. To Ana and Di, they are perfect. They are home. But Di, an illegal robot called a Metal, has started to glitch, and Ana will risk just about anything to avoid losing her best friend in the universe.

Robbert Valerio lost his father in the Metal rebellion that also took away The Iron Kingdom’s royal family. As the celestial convergence approaches, and with it the crowning of a new emperor, Robb finds new information that could be the key to finding his father. The possible proof that he survived the rebellion after all is too much to ignore, and Robb begins the hunt for truth.

As the luck of the goddess would have it, the search for an answer to Di’s glitching leads Ana right to Robb, and the two realize that there could be a lot more aboard the mysterious ship Tsarina than each originally imagined.

This whirlwind adventure takes the old-as-time story of Anastasia and launches it into space, where it takes on a life of its own. Multiple races from across the universe find danger, hope, and love (in many forms), in this interstellar saga. Poston does a fantastic job of world building through her characters’ eyes, showing the reader the world as they see it, rather than info-dumping huge amounts of data abut space colonies and future-world-orders. With plenty of nods to all the Sci-Fi stories of our youth, this book was a delight form start to finish. I, personally, cannot wait for the second and final book in this duology to be published next month.

This is one of those books that is definitely YA – the characters are mostly in their late teens – but also appeals to readers of just about any age. So far, there’s nothing inappropriate for younger readers either, so barring anything happening in the second book, this one would be safe for precocious younger readers who’ve exhausted everything else in the middle grade range.

HHC Rating: 5 Stars.

Other reviews in this series:
Book 2 – Soul of Stars (Book available July 23rd, Review available August 13th)

Other reviews for this author:
Once Upon A Con, Book 1 – Geekerella
Once Upon A Con, Book 2 – The Princess and The Fan Girl (Review Coming Soon!)

On The Way To The Wedding (Bridgerton, #8) – Julia Quinn

Source: Goodreads

Gregory Bridgerton is the seventh of eight children, all of whom, aside from him, have married for love. So it’s no surprise that he believes in the all-consuming emotion. He just hasn’t found the right girl yet. He’s sure he hasn’t. He would know, right away, when the right person showed up. And then he does. A single glimpse and he’s lost. He’s found her. And yet, she couldn’t care less.

Lucy Abernathy doesn’t believe in love. She’s seen men lose their heads over her best friend so often that it has become almost funny. Practically engaged herself, she doesn’t mind when Hermione’s beaus ignore her existence, but it would be nice to be asked to dance on her own merit once in a while. Hermione claims to be in love with someone else, anyway, so the gentlemen are wasting their time, even if they don’t all give up so easily.

When Hermione has a sudden change of heart and finds herself in a true love-match, Lucy starts to look at things differently. She starts to wonder if she’s been missing something in front of her this whole time. Could love be real? Could she have it, if she took a chance? And what about being practically engaged?


The final installment in the saga of the Bridgerton family, On the Way to the Wedding, does not disappoint. Easily the most complicated of the series storylines, Gregory must adjust his own perspective before he can admit his true feelings, and he’ll have to face his worst fears to reach his happily ever after.

I always start this book a little sad. I know I’m at the end of the series once again, and I drag my feet because I don’t want it to end. The story also starts a little slow, because its complicated narrative requires it. So much happens in so little time, and our hero and heroine go through such drastic changes, face such strong obstacles, that the slow start is the only slow piece of the story.

Gregory, whom we’ve looked at primarily as a child for the duration of the series, is finally finding his footing as an adult, and his family gives him subtle and not so subtle nudges in the right direction. In any Bridgerton novel, the love story is always overlapped by the hero or heroine’s journey to find their place in the large family, and the youngest son is no different. The books are just as much about finding your place in the world as they are about settling down and finding the love of your life, and that is the strongest reason as to why I come back to this series again and again.

HHC Rating: 4.5 Stars.

Other reviews in this series:
Book 1 – The Duke And I
Book 2 – The Viscount Who Loved Me
Book 3 – An Offer From A Gentleman
Book 4 – Romancing Mister Bridgerton
Book 5 – To Sir Phillip, With Love
Book 6 – When He Was Wicked
Book 7 – It’s In His Kiss

It’s In His Kiss (Bridgerton, #7) – Julia Quinn

Source: Goodreads

Hyacinth Bridgerton may be the youngest of the Bridgerton clan, but she is far from the picture of refined elegance that her elder siblings garnered in the ballrooms of London. Hyacinth has been dealing professionally in gossip and intrigue since she was born. It’s no wonder, then, that her best friend in the world is the only woman in London able to speak her mind whenever she pleases: Lady Danbury. They have an appointment every Tuesday, where Hyacinth usually entertains the grandmotherly figure by reading the latest novel that they’ve come upon.

It is at one of these Tuesday appointments that Hyacinth makes the unfortunate acquaintance of Lady Danbury’s grandson, Gareth St. Clair. Gareth is a younger son forced into the position of heir, but still unable to escape his father’s ominous shadow. When he comes upon his only inheritance from his paternal grandmother, an old diary written in Italian, Gareth knows he will help to translate its contents and potentially locate her missing jewelry in order to rescue the St. Clair estates from his father’s clutches. Enter Hyacinth, who has less than a firm grasp of Italian, but is his maternal grandmother’s trusted friend, the exact kind of person Gareth himself is short on these days.

As Gareth and Hyacinth delve into Grandmother St. Clair’s diary and churn up the truth about Gareth’s past, the young man must also come to terms with his present and future, and decide if that future has space enough for Hyacinth, who is herself discovering what kind of woman she wants to become.

After the clump of books 4, 5, and 6 happening concurrently, it felt nice for time to pick back up to its normal pace again. Hyacinth has always been one of my favorite characters, as has Lady Danbury, and Gareth’s sarcasm and wit fit into the mix quite nicely. The rest of the Bridgertons orbited our hero and heroine well, and the twists and turns of the plot kept me guessing. Hyacinth is nothing if not the queen of mischief, so it was no surprise that she got up to all kinds of escapades in her own story. The hunt for the jewels and the addition of Italian as the language of choice for the diary really set this one apart. Once you’ve finished all of the Bridgerton novels, you’ll definitely want to check out The Bridgertons: Happily Ever After for even more fun with all of the couples – though Hyacinth’s final story will forever hold a special place filled with glee in my heart.

HHC Rating: 5 Stars.

Other reviews in this series:
Book 1 – The Duke And I
Book 2 – The Viscount Who Loved Me
Book 3 – An Offer From A Gentleman
Book 4 – Romancing Mister Bridgerton
Book 5 – To Sir Phillip, With Love
Book 6 – When He Was Wicked
Book 8 – On The Way To The Wedding

When He Was Wicked (Bridgerton, #6) – Julia Quinn

Source: Goodreads

Concurrent with the previous two books in the Bridgerton saga is Franchesca’s story. Although she is rarely mentioned and even more rarely seen in the previous novels, Francesca is a Bridgerton through and through. Married a few years before the start of this story, Franchesca is supremely happy with her husband, John Stirling, Earl of Kilmartin, and they are set to celebrate their anniversary when he dies suddenly. Left widowed, she turns to the new Earl, John’s cousin Michael, for support. Michael, however, feels suddenly that he must get away from Franchesca as well as John’s memory, and flees to India for three years.

As the years go by, Franchesca puts her time as the Countess of Kilmartin into running the estate in Michael’s place, but all the while she feels lonelier and lonelier. After three years, she happens to arrive in London for the season at the same moment that Michael returns from the continent, both of them ready to face the marriage mart. As they attempt to rekindle their friendship and navigate their way through the overcrowded ballrooms unexpected sparks begin to fly, and Franchesca finds herself running back to Scotland in the fear that she might dishonor John’s memory by reaching for the one thing she never thought she would find again: love.

I really wish we had focused a bit more on her first marriage, since John felt distant an unimportant, despite him being deeply involved in the storyline and the two main character’s lives. That being said, I quite enjoyed Colin’s interruptions of Michael’s quiet evenings, egging him on. We got to know both main characters pretty well despite Franchesca being a bit more of a loner than the rest of the Bridgertons, which explains her being rarely present in the previous books. Colin, Eloise, and Hyacinth are in nearly every book, meddling in their siblings affairs, but Franchesca operates almost entirely independent of her family. This book was mostly Franchesca and Michael insisting they could never do exactly what they were in the midst of doing, and people pointing out what they were doing, even while they denied it. The illness aspects of the book definitely helped move the plot along, but also detracted from potential character development.

I am always unsure how I feel about this one. On the one hand, I want more of Franchesca’s story. I need to understand her as a child, sharing a birthday with Eloise, in order to understand her as an adult. Maybe that is the problem I also had with the previous book. I needed more of a relationship between Eloise and Franchesca to understand Eloise.

HHC rating: 3.5 Stars.

Other Reviews in this Series:
Book 1 – The Duke and I
Book 2 – The Viscount Who Loved Me
Book 3 – An Offer From A Gentleman
Book 4 – Romancing Mister Bridgerton
Book 5 – To Sir Phillip, With Love
Book 7 – It’s In His Kiss
Book 8 – On The Way To The Wedding