Heart of Iron (Heart of Iron, #1) – Ashley Poston

Source: Goodreads

Ana and Di were found floating in an escape pod seven years ago, with no memories of what came before. They’ve built their own family out of Captain Siege’s misfit pirate crew, beings from all parts of the galaxy, ravaged by plague and run out by oppression. To Ana and Di, they are perfect. They are home. But Di, an illegal robot called a Metal, has started to glitch, and Ana will risk just about anything to avoid losing her best friend in the universe.

Robbert Valerio lost his father in the Metal rebellion that also took away The Iron Kingdom’s royal family. As the celestial convergence approaches, and with it the crowning of a new emperor, Robb finds new information that could be the key to finding his father. The possible proof that he survived the rebellion after all is too much to ignore, and Robb begins the hunt for truth.

As the luck of the goddess would have it, the search for an answer to Di’s glitching leads Ana right to Robb, and the two realize that there could be a lot more aboard the mysterious ship Tsarina than each originally imagined.

This whirlwind adventure takes the old-as-time story of Anastasia and launches it into space, where it takes on a life of its own. Multiple races from across the universe find danger, hope, and love (in many forms), in this interstellar saga. Poston does a fantastic job of world building through her characters’ eyes, showing the reader the world as they see it, rather than info-dumping huge amounts of data abut space colonies and future-world-orders. With plenty of nods to all the Sci-Fi stories of our youth, this book was a delight form start to finish. I, personally, cannot wait for the second and final book in this duology to be published next month.

This is one of those books that is definitely YA – the characters are mostly in their late teens – but also appeals to readers of just about any age. So far, there’s nothing inappropriate for younger readers either, so barring anything happening in the second book, this one would be safe for precocious younger readers who’ve exhausted everything else in the middle grade range.

HHC Rating: 5 Stars.

Other reviews in this series:
Book 2 – Soul of Stars (Book available July 23rd, Review available August 13th)

Other reviews for this author:
Once Upon A Con, Book 1 – Geekerella
Once Upon A Con, Book 2 – The Princess and The Fan Girl (Review Coming Soon!)

The Diviners (The Diviners, #1) – Libba Bray

Diviners-The-Diviners-Libba-Bray

Source: Goodreads

 

Evangeline O’Neill has special powers. She can see important moments in a person’s life just by holding something that belongs to them. This talent, of course, is not accepted in Zenith, Ohio. After a particularly bad evening of illegal drinking, the seventeen-year-old is shipped off to New York City to live with her bachelor uncle, William Fitzgerald, who runs The Museum of Creepy Crawlies, and his mysterious assistant, Jericho. Evie reunites with her childhood friend and the daughter of revolutionists, Mabel, as well as some new friends including Theta, a showgirl, and her brother Henry, a piano player, a thief named Sam, and a numbers runner named Memphis who might just be magical himself. Life can’t be the berries forever though, and before long Evie is called upon to use her powers to help stop a murderer before he raises the antichrist and wipes out all of man kind. Just another summer in 1920s New York, right?

 

I’ve heard about this book on and off since it came out in 2012, and I finally picked it up from the library in August of 2017. Definitely not disappointing! While the writing is easy to follow (except for the 20s slang, which I had to look up) and the chapters are short, the gruesomeness and maturity of the plot and characters’ thoughts definitely put this book squarely in the Young Adult category. If the reading level were a little higher I might even put it in adult, even though over half of the characters are ages 17-19.

If you can’t stand gore in your books, don’t read this. About half of the murders are detailed, and all of the bodies are described once they are discovered. If I was close to stopping my reading more the night and I knew a murder chapter was imminent, I would stop before it so I didn’t have it running around my brain all night long. Not that it really helped, because I still knew it was coming, so my brain usually decided to try and guess how it would go down *facepalm*. In that regard, I’m glad I’ve finished the book. At the same time, I’m sad to let the world go for a while until I get the next book. Bray’s version of 1920s New York City positively shines. I found myself wishing I could visit for the weekend (sans murders) to visit the theatres and clubs she describes in such vibrant detail. The buildings and the city are just as much characters as the human (and not so human) population.

If I were a cry-in-the-corner type of person, my horror-hating-soul would be doing that, because I don’t like being terrified of what’s coming, but I’m a bloody Gryffindor, and we don’t show fear, so I just marched on and kept reading. Overall, I think the horror aspects were very well balanced with the daily life in the 1920s and the mystery parts, which made me quite enjoy myself despite the demons lurking in the shadows.

Definitely pick this up if you have any interest in America’s supernatural history (I’m personally hoping one of the books in this quartet focuses on the witch trials), or if you adore 1920s period fiction, or if you liked Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, because this book is pos-i-tute-ly for you. Also, this cover is magic. I love it.

 

HHC Rating: 5 Stars

 

Other reviews in this series:
Book #2 – Lair of Dreams
Book #3 – Before The Devil Breaks You
Book #4 – Untitled – TBD

Supergirl: Being Super (Supergirl: Being Super #1 – 4) – Mariko Tamaki, Illustrated by Joëlle Jones

Supergirl-Being-Super-Mariko-Tamaki-ILL-Joelle-Jones2
Source: Goodreads

I love Supergirl’s story. It can be told in so many different ways. Kal-El’s elder cousin, stuck in a time warp for half a lifetime, finally arrived. Sometimes Kara and Clark don’t know each other at all, and sometimes she’s been sent to protect him. Kara is warm, loving, curious, and strong as hell.

This version is Kara at her most human. Trying to be herself without exposing her differences. The story hits all the right notes, and the artwork is magnificent (some might even say out of this world, but they are significantly better at wordplay than I). Aside from the obvious, I’d like to take a moment to truly appreciate the diversity in the town of Midvale. Sure, Kara still looks like the quintessential American Cheerleader, but her friends and colleagues have varying appearances. From body type to skin tone to family background, the inhabitants of Midvale flourish, and color the landscape with their personalities and hobbies.

 

I have always enjoyed Supergirl and even attempted to keep up with her story arc when DC launched The New 52 while I was working on my undergraduate degree, despite not being an active graphic novel/comic book consumer. I hadn’t intended to pick up another comic book any time soon, but then I came across this bind-up of four (I honestly can’t even remember where) and suddenly I owned it. I started it and couldn’t put it down. Kara felt real, alive, and ready to make a difference in her world. I sincerely hope Tamaki and Jones continue their collaboration and bring us more stories of Krypton’s last survivor.

 

HHC Rating:  5 Stars.

 

More Books Like This:
Lois Lane – Fallout