Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit-451-Ray-Bradbury

Source: Goodreads

Guy Montag is a fireman. His job is to set fires and burn all of the illegal books in the city. He loves his job, even takes pride in the lingering smell of kerosene, until the night he meets Clarissa. The self-proclaimed insane seventeen-year-old changes Montag’s life in an instant, and once his brain starts turning over all she has said it cannot stop. But thinking is almost as dangerous as reading in Montag’s world, and the consequences are more than he could have imagined.

 

As we follow Guy Montag through his life post meeting Clarissa, we are given a small glimpse into the world in which he lives. Just a taste, but enough to be absolutely terrified. Highspeed hovercars, fireproof houses, talking walls, banned books, incessant advertising on every hyperspeed subway car, and the loss of all free speech and free thought. If that wasn’t bad enough, the firehouse dog will chill you to your bones.

This book has been on my list to read for more than half of my life. I wanted to read it because it was about books. I didn’t want to read it because they were going to burn all of the books. And back, and forth, and so on. If I had actually read Fahrenheit 451 at twelve or thirteen, it probably would have had much less of an impact on me. I wouldn’t be familiar with the majority of the works mentioned. I wouldn’t know what was being burned. Reading it at twenty-five, I was extremely aware of how influential the books were. Plato, Shakespeare, The Holy Bible, and millions of others. It is easy to believe that people would have rather died in the flames than be forced to live in a world with no working logic, a world that is enslaved to media through seashell earpieces.

Fahrenheit 451 is the first thing I’ve ever read by Bradbury, but his words have a liveliness to them, even in the slow and quiet parts, that many writers lack. It makes everything interesting, from the chattering of a seashell earpiece to the read and yellow flames licking up the side of a formerly fireproof building. I can’t wait to dive into more of Bradbury’s stories to see what secrets they hold.

 

HHC Rating: 5 Stars

Rise of a Hero (Farsala, #2) – Hilari Bell

Farsala-Rise-Of-A-Hero-Hilari-Bell

Source: Goodreads

Kavi, Jiaan, and Soraya are struggling to find their places in the new world they have been thrust into since the arrival of the Hrum army. Soraya faces never seeing her family again, Jiaan inherits a role he was never prepared for, and Kavi attempts to play both sides to save his people. As the Hrum swarm the countryside, only one person could possibly bring Farsala’s people together in its time of greatest need: Sorahb. But has the hero of legend really been returned by the gods? Or is he the spirit inside all people that unites them as one entity?

 

The second book in The Farsala Trilogy moves slightly faster than the first, but very little actually happens. Rather than world-building, it focuses more on character-building. Kavi’s past is revealed, along with his deep-seated motivations. Jiaan, thrust into a leadership role despite the presence of full-blooded deghans who survived the battle of the Sendar Wall, matures into his own skin, no longer the scared page-boy from Fall of a Kingdom. Soraya learns to survive on her own, to drop her pride and accept the people around her on their own merit rather than the circumstances of their birth.

The character development is truly what kept me reading this time around. I hope the final book wraps everything up because at this pace we could go for another three books and still have months left on the Hrum’s timeline. I get the feeling that this series would sell best as an omnibus. If I didn’t already own all three volumes, I don’t know that I would continue with the series.

 

HHC Rating:  3 Stars

 

Other reviews in this series:
Book #1 – Fall of a Kingdom
Book #3 – Forging the Sword (Review Available 10/17)

In Other Lands – Sarah Rees Brennan

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Source: Goodreads

Elliot Schafer is obnoxious. No one at school can stand him, his father at home ignores him, and his mother left when he was a baby. Then one day his teacher drives him to the middle of nowhere and sells him to an oddly dressed woman because he can see a stone wall where his classmates cannot. What ensues is part adventure, part education, part self-discovery, and all about the love.

 

A review of this book popped up on Goodreads about two months ago, and I requested it from my library immediately. Blurbed by many well-known authors, including Leigh Bardugo, Tamora Pierce, Cassandra Claire, Gregory Maguire, and Holly Black, this book was a definite addition to my TBR. In Other Lands was published just under a month ago, on August 17th, and a copy arrived at my library a day early! I can’t even tell you how exciting that was.

Let me start by saying that there are no chapters. The book is sectioned by year, following Elliot from the ages of 13 to 18. The ‘otherland’ is a fantastic world full of diverse peoples and even more diverse cultures. This book is not only a play on the portal-world trope but also a narrative on how our culture is being constantly blended and added to with new words and beliefs. From sexuality to gender stereotypes to machismo and sexism, this book hits it all right on the head. With a Trigon ball.

Being CisHet and having people close to me who identify on the LGBTQ+ spectrum made this book all the more dear to me. While I’m sure not everyone will agree, I felt that it did a good job of handling the differences in sexuality and not blowing them out of proportion, as often happens in literature and in other media. It wasn’t anyone’s defining characteristic, and that’s exactly as it should be. That being said, there is quite a bit of discussion throughout of intimacy and menstruation, as well as actual (but not overly detailed) intimacy. So, I wouldn’t recommend reading this if you’re under the age of, say, 14, or if you are uncomfortable at all with that kind of scene, whether CisHet or LGBTQ+. With the addition of a few of the other cultures whose major sexism is the reverse of humans, it can all become just a bit much all at once.

 

Overall I am glad to have read it and will be recommending it to many of my friends, CisHet as well as LGBTQ+, to read.

 

HHC Rating: 4 Stars

Fall of a Kingdom (Farsala, #1) – Hilari Bell

Farsala-Fall-Of-A-Kingdom-Hilari-Bell

Source: Goodreads

 

Jiaan is the eldest son of the high commander of Farsala’s army, but his half-blood status means he can never inherit, and he can never fight with the full-blooded deghans. His half-sister Soraya is a full-blooded deghass, but she will face sacrificial abandonment so that her people can win the oncoming war against the mighty Hrum. Kavi is a crippled peddler, but his slight shoulders hold the greatest weight. Will he choose to aid Farsala’s deghans, who have treated his people harshly for centuries, or the Hrum, who promise legal equality once Farsala is conquered?

 

This series is a re-read for me, but I remembered next to nothing about it aside from the fact that there was magic and a war. I also remember not loving the first book, but that the rest of them were better.

This first volume reads more like an introduction to the characters than its own story arc. There is some world building, but not enough that I understand the hierarchy of the deghans and the peasantry in any real way. There is mention of different languages, but not enough description to know who speaks which and what the differences are. There are also major time jumps. We seldom see what two characters are doing in the same timeframe. Overall, I finished the book feeling somewhat confused. Somehow, Fall of a Kingdom falls victim to what is typically a second book slump, even though it is the first book in a series.

Here is what I was able to understand of the Farsalan culture:
The kingdom of Farsala is made up mostly of plains, though it has swamps on the coast, and mountains, cliffs, and deserts as well. The Farsalan people are separated into two sects. The deghans (deghans and deghasses) are the nobility, who intermarry to keep the bloodlines pure. A sign of blood purity is straight, jet black hair. The peasants, on the other hand, often bear the bastard children of the deghans, who then go on to fight as foot soldiers in the army. The peasants all have curly light brown hair. Their main export is horses, and their cavalry is the strongest in the world. Their belief system is founded on Azura, the sun god, who keeps them safe from the wicked djinn, who use their magical powers to trick men into committing crimes. It is this belief system that sentences Soraya to be sacrificed so that Azura will bless the army with victory. Each of the Farsalan deghans’ noble families has it’s own animal sigil, and there are giant statues of them arranged in a line at the palace to show who is highest in the gahn’s (the emperor) favor. And that’s it.

I don’t have a recommendation either way for this book just yet, but I’ll come back and let you know after I’ve re-read the other books in the series.

 

HHC Rating: 2.75 Stars

 

Other reviews in this series:
Book #2 – Rise of a Hero (Review Available 9/26)
Book #3 – Forging the Sword (Review Available 10/17)

Top 10 Board Books I Read As A Nanny

For the last ten months, I have had the pleasure of nannying for my sweet baby cousin (A.K.A. Grandchild #20, or G20 for short). Now that he’s going on 18-months-old, he’s getting ready to start daycare as I prepare to start a more corporate job. Before my tenure as his nanny ends, however, I wanted to share with you all some of our favorite board books. We read each of these upwards of six or seven times a day, often over and over again in a row. I know what you’re going to say, “Amanda! You’ve created a monster!” and I, of course, will reply to that by saying YES, I HAVE! A READING MONSTER! MUAHHAHA!!! Because I am so proud of the little reading monster he has already become such a very young age. On that note and in no particular order, here are the top 10 board books that I read every day as a nanny.

 

 

#1 – Are You My Mother by P.D. Eastman

A baby bird hatches and cannot find his mother anywhere, so he leaves the nest to search for her.

This was one of my favorites growing up, so I bought it for G20 when he was born. It has quickly become a fan favorite, and I like to think that is t least partially due to my rendition of animal and machine noises to accompany the story.

Are-You-My-Mother-P-D-Eastman
Source: Goodreads

 

#2 – Jamberry by Bruce Degen

A boy and a bear go berry picking and end up in a land made of food.

Another childhood favorite, my mom sent this one for G20. His favorite part? Pretending to eat all of the berries!

Jamberry-Bruce-Degen
Source: Goodreads

 

 

#3 – The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

A caterpillar is born and eats everything in sight until he becomes so tired that he builds a little house and wakes up to a miracle!

G20’s favorite part of this one is all the foods the caterpillar eats every day. Good for counting, and the foods all have little holes in them where the caterpillar eats through. Great for little fingers!

The-Very-Hungy-Caterpillar-Eric-Carle
Source: Goodreads

 

#4 – Little Blue Truck – by Alice Schertle

Little Blue Truck makes friends with all of the farm animals, and doesn’t hold a grudge against the big dump truck that runs him off the road and then gets stuck in a mud puddle.

An old neighbor sent this because their own boys were loving it. G20 is obsessed with all of the noises we make to go along with this one (especially the dump truck horn)!

Little-Blue-Truck-Alice-Schertle
Source: Goodreads

 

#5 – Chicka Chicka Boom Boom – By Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault

The lowercase letters dare each other to climb a coconut tree, but will it hold all of them?

Anyone have this one memorized? *raises hand*

Chicka-Chicka-Boom-Boom-Bill-Martin-Jr-and-John-Archambault
Source: Goodreads

 

#6 – Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown

A little bunny says goodnight to all of the objects in his room.

This story always turns into a game of find the mouse.

Goodnight-Moon-Margaret-Wise-Brown
Source: Goodreads

 

 

#7 – The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper

A little blue engine volunteers to drive toys over a mountain when another train is unable to do so.

Teaching kids they can do anything they put their minds to, no matter their size, since 1930. Props to Piper for first realizing that ‘I think I can, I think I can’ actually sounds like a train going ‘chugga-chugga, chugga-chugga’ and thereby convincing the world’s children that trains are always giving themselves a pep-talk.

The-Little-Engine-That-Could-Watty-Piper
Source: Goodreads

 

 

#8 – Good Night, Sammy by Cyndy Szekeres

Sammy the fox can’t get to sleep, so his parents sing to his twitchy tail and rocking chair until everything falls asleep, including them!

A good bedtime book, bringing everything down a notch so your child can get off the hyper train and go to sleep.

Goodnight-Sammy-Cyndy-Szekeres
Source: Goodreads

 

 

#9 – Little Hoot – by Am Krouse Rosenthal

Little Hoot just wants to go to bed, but as an owl he must stay up late, late, late! How ever will he manage?

A bit of reverse psychology never hurts. You may recognize the author from being touted on various celebrity Instagram accounts, as her books are loved far and wide. Although Rosenthal passed very recently, she was in the news this past year for setting up an online dating profile for her husband. You can read her essay about it here, but be sure to have a box of tissues nearby, because I just re-read it sitting in the library and now I’m a mess.

Little-Hoot-Amy-Krouse-Rosenthal
Source: Goodreads

 

 

#10 – Guess How Much I Love You – Sam McBratney

A father puts his son to bed, but first the baby bunny tries to convince his father that he loves him more.

This book is just adorable. Our grandparents sent it to G20 for his first birthday, and we read it frequently.

Guess-How-Much-I-Love-You-Sam-McBratney
Source: Goodreads

 

What books do your little ones love? Share them below!

 

 

 

Until next time,

Amanda

Cover Reveal (& Other Goodies!): The Dragons on Nova – Elise Kova

COVER REVEAL

 

Today is the day!! Today, Elise Kova and Rockstar Book Tours are revealing the cover for The Dragons of Nova, which releases July 11, 2017! I am beyond excited to get to be a part of their Cover Reveal Blitz Team, which means this blog, along with many others, get to bring you the cover in all of its glory, along with a synopsis and an EXCLUSIVE EXCERPT from the book, AND a giveaway of an ARC (Advanced Readers’ Copy), signed by Elise!

Scroll on down to see everything! IT. IS. SO. GOOD.

 

 

 

 

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Title: THE DRAGONS OF NOVA (Loom Saga #2)

Author: Elise Kova

Pub. Date: July 11, 2017

Publisher: Keymaster Press

Formats: Hardcover, eBook, audiobook

Pages: 488

Find it: Amazon | B&N | TBD | Goodreads

 

Can we just talk about this gorgeous cover?! It features Cvareh, as we met in the first book, The Alchemists of Loom, standing on top of what can only be a Dragon glider! And the immediate background of Nova with the boco birds flying past, not to mention the scaling in the far background and the House Xin symbol in the O of Nova, oh my goodness, this is all just too cool!

If you haven’t read The Alchemists of Loom yet, it’s ON SALE through May 7th as an eBook for 99¢! You can access the sale here. There’s also going to be a read-along of The Alchemists of Loom starting May 8th and running through the end of the month, so now is the perfect opportunity for you to catch up on the series before The Dragons of Nova releases in July! Find the Facebook group for the read-along here.

If I haven’t yet managed to convince you to start this series, check out my review of the first book here!

 

Now let’s get into the synopsis and the excerpt!

 

Cvareh returns home to his sky world of Nova with the genius crafter Arianna as his temperamental guest. The mercurial inventor possesses all the Xin family needs to turn the tides of a centuries-old power struggle, but the secrets she harbors must be earned with trust — hard to come by for Ari, especially when it comes to Dragons. On Nova, Ari finds herself closer to exacting vengeance against the traitor who killed everything — and everyone – she once loved. But before Ari can complete her campaign of revenge, the Crimson Court exposes her shadowed past and reveals something even more dangerous sparking between her and Cvareh.

While Nova is embroiled in blood sport and political games, the rebels on Loom prepare for an all-out assault on their Dragon oppressors. Florence unexpectedly finds herself at the forefront of change, as her unique blend of skills — and quick-shooting accuracy — makes her a force to be reckoned with. For the future of her world, she vows vengeance against the Dragons.

Before the rebellion can rise, though, the Guilds must fall.

*****Exclusive Excerpt!*****

“They’re coming from the front!” Nora screamed over the crescendo of the engine gaining speed. On cue, the train lurched as an endwig was splattered to a bloody mess on the point of the engine’s pilot.

“Bloody cogs,” Florence cursed. The Vicar Alchemist had sent her to protect the mission as the Revolver, but one of her wasn’t going to be enough. “I’m going to the engine.”

“What are we going to do?” The usually self-sure Nora had the face of a cornered hare.

“You’re going to fight.” Florence passed her a weapon.

“I’ve never shot a gun before.”

“Now is a great time to learn.”

“I’m an Alchemist!”

Seriously, Florence was a breath away from shooting the woman herself. “You’re dead if you don’t adapt! There’s three more bombs exactly like the ones you just used, right there. Just fend them off until the train gets up to speed. But don’t use any other disks.”

Florence had no more time to waste as the train lurched again. They just had to survive until the train reached full speed. For all the endwig were, they certainly couldn’t keep up with a locomotive.

She hoped.

The wind whipped her hair around her face as she stuck her head from the train car. Florence reached out for the ladder to the right of the door, scaling up before another endwig could emerge. She swung up just in time as an explosion nearly blew her foot clean off.

“By the five guilds, you two only had three bombs!” she screamed over the wind, not knowing if they could hear. “Ration them a bit!”

Standing, Florence looked in horror at the tracks ahead. Dozens of endwig lined the path, running eagerly to meet the train. She loaded six canisters at once.

Jumping to the tender, Florence lost her footing atop the moving train car. A nail snapped clean off as she sought a grip that would prevent her from being thrown to certain death. If she fell now, she would never get back on the vessel. She’d be torn limb from limb.

Gritting her teeth, Florence rose to her knees, shooting two endwig in the process. She wedged herself between two grooves on the top of the tender. Blood pooled around her shins as she dug them into the metal for a grip where there was none, but she was stable enough to take aim, and that meant she could open fire.

Five shots down, and Florence reloaded her gun. Endwig came relentlessly like a never-ending nightmare. But the train didn’t gain any more speed. She repeated the process, waiting for the vessel to be like her bullets, whizzing through the night at deadly speeds.

“Anders, now would be a great time to open her up!” she screamed.

There was no reply.

“Anders, Rotus, we need speed, get us out of here faster!”

Five long claws curled around the door of the engine in answer. Florence watched in horror as the white silhouette of an endwig, dotted in the black blood of a Chimera, pulled itself from the engine room. Florence swallowed hard.

They were without Rivet and Raven, stumbling through the darkness, enemies at all sides. She raised her gun slowly, looking fearlessly at the face of death itself. Her revolver was steady over the rocking of the train.

“You think I’m not used to this?” Her mouth curled into a mad grin. “I’ve been fighting my way out of the darkness my whole life. And you’re not going to stop me now.”

Gunshots echoed through the forest.

*****

About Elise:

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Elise Kova has always had a profound love of fantastical worlds. Somehow, she managed to focus on the real world long enough to graduate with a Master’s in Business Administration before crawling back under her favorite writing blanket to conceptualize her next magic system. She currently lives in St. Petersburg, Florida, and when she is not writing can be found playing video games, watching anime, or talking with readers on social media. She is the USA Today bestselling author of the Air Awakens Series as well as the Loom Saga (Keymaster, 2017).

Website | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Tumblr | Goodreads

 

And last but definitely not least, the ARC giveaway! Click through to the Rafflecopter page to enter your details and be entered to win!

Giveaway Details:

One (1) Winner will receive a signed advanced readers’ copy of THE DRAGONS OF NOVA.

Enter to win through Rafflecopter using your Facebook account or email address HERE!

 

 

 

Thank you all so much for coming by today and checking out the cover reveal! I don’t know how I’m going to wait until July to read The Dragons of Nova. I may just have to re-read The Alchemists of Loom a few more times before then!

If you enjoyed this post, give it a like to let me know, and feel free to share it on Facebook and other social media platforms to spread the word!

 

 

Until Next Time,

Amanda

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend – Katarina Bivald (T: Swedish-English by Alice Menzies)

the-readers-of-broken-wheel-recommend-katarina-bivald-translated-by-alice-menzies

Source: Goodreads

Sara Lindqvist, a bookstore clerk from Sweden, travels to rural Iowa to visit her pen pal, Amy Harris. Unfortunately for Sara, she arrives just as Amy’s funeral is ending. Unsure what to do with her two-month-long visa, Sara is collectively taken in by the town of Broken Wheel, where she slowly comes to know everyone she has only heard about through Amy’s letters.

 

This book has many high ratings, and I have heard many people discuss it and how much they loved it. I don’t think it lived up to the hype, but I did enjoy it.

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend should have some kind of warning label attached, however, due to the spoilers for other books that are contained in its pages. Yes, Sara and Amy are huge book lovers and so book talk is to be expected, but Bivald’s book contains huge spoilers for works such as Pride and PrejudiceFried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop CaféLittle WomenTo Kill A MockingbirdGone with the WindJane Eyre, and The Horse Whisperer (book and film) to name a few. Having read most of these, the spoilers didn’t phase me so much, but I feel truly terrible for those readers who have had all of these wonderful stories ruined for them without warning. I would also like to note the author’s fictional adherence to some laws, yet complete ignoring of others. A town cannot just open a bookstore without doing any paperwork. They just can’t. Sara even says she wouldn’t be able to open one in Sweden for a host of reasons, but these reasons apparently cease to apply at the town line of Broken Wheel.

That being said, the translation is impeccable. The story itself takes around fifty pages before it actually gets interesting at all, but once things start rolling it’s quite a fun ride. Going into the book I didn’t have any background beyond Amy’s death, Sara’s arrival, and that a bookstore was somehow involved. Let me tell you, those the bare essentials. So bare, in fact, that they may be almost meaningless. This book is not really about a bookstore. Sure, everything revolves around said establishment, but only because Sara happens to be there. No, the real story is the town, the people’s who’s lives have almost lost meaning rising up like flowers in the spring, and how every single tiny thing we do can change the world around us. Oh, and of course there’s unrequited love and complicated romances and diversity galore.

Overall I’m not sure what I expected from this book, but I certainly didn’t expect a fluffy romance crossed with a comeback story, and I’m still not sure how I feel about it. The beginning was boring, but the ending had me in tears. At the time of writing, I’ve only been done with the book for about 10 hours, so things are a little jumbled. Ah, well, maybe it’s just one of those things you’ll have to read for yourself.

 

HHC Rating: 3.75 stars