Spinning Silver – Naomi Novik

Source: Goodreads


Miryem comes from moneylenders on both sides of her family, but while her grandfather has made a name for himself in a walled city, her own father has trouble even approaching his clients in their small town. When Miryem tires of living in squalor while the warm and well-fed townsfolk spin wicked stories about her family and others like her, she takes it upon herself to reclaim her mother’s lended dowry. In doing so, she sets off a chain reaction that leads to dark consequences with the Staryk, who haunt the forests and have raided the surrounding towns for gold each winter for as long as anyone can remember.

A story of faeries and witches and demons who try to push the seasons around for their own gain, Spinning Silver is a masterpiece of interwoven storylines. Heroes all, Miryem, Wanda, and Irina must band together to bring nature back into balance and return peace to their families and their kingdom.



This book was fabulous. Novik’s writing astounds me every time I crack a book. It haunts me well after I’ve closed it, and sticks its nose into whatever projects of my own I’m working on, saying “Ohhh, but can we make this more complicated and awesome?!” Which is wonderful, but also frustrating when I’m just outlining.

This was the second book I’ve read by Novik, the first being Uprooted, which simply took my breath away. I think this one was slightly harder to follow, just because it took me a few sentences into each chapter to figure out whose POV we were supposed to be in, because, hey, there are many, and three of them are girls who are all roughly the same age and think in similar ways. Nevertheless, I very much appreciated the different personalities and the subtleties in which they were different, and it was most interesting, to me at least, to see three similar people react to things in totally different ways.

I can’t say much about the storylines themselves because SpOiLeRs, but the scenery was beautiful: Winter in Russia, similar to the Winternight trilogy by Katherine Arden vibes (Catch my review of the first novel in that series here!), but definitely set a few years later because transit seems to be much easier in this universe than that one. The three heroes from vastly differing backgrounds and yet all facing similar fates really hits home, while also giving you a much broader view of the world than if it had only followed one of them. This is a book I will not be forgetting any time soon.

HHC Rating: 5 Stars.

Other books by this author:
Uprooted

TV Review – Wynonna Earp, Season #1

Wynonna-Earp-Season-One-Syfy

Source: IMDB

Wynonna Earp has been running all her life. Hated by nearly everyone in her small town and thought to be off her rocker by the rest, she had no intention of ever returning to Purgatory. Brought home by the sudden and mysterious death of her uncle, Wynonna gets drawn into a quest for redemption that has been plaguing her family for decades.

 

First off, the diversity in this show is so SO good. Secondly, the number of strong female characters is pretty darn high and that rules. When it comes to the romances, the chemistry and build up isn’t always 100% there, but there is plenty of comical awkwardness to make up for it. I’m not a fan of zombies, but these zombie-esque monsters have been great so far. Even though it’s quite a gory show, it’s still fairly stomachable.

Wynonna, as the title character, is the focus of the show. However, there are plenty of cast regulars that hold their own and often have large storylines of their own. Wynonna’s kid sister, the black-ops agent sent to look into Purgatory’s strange occurrences, the local law enforcement, and even well-known historical characters are all well developed and intriguing to follow along their own paths that criss-cross Wynonna’s life.

To be honest, what I loved most about this show was the old-timey-western nods because I’m a fan of John Wayne and Clint Eastwood, but with the season finale, the show takes a turn towards decidedly more Syfy Channel material. I’m still not sure how I feel about it since it was all only in the finale, but I’m just not quite as excited to watch season two as I was season one.

Besides the old-west vibes, I really enjoyed the snarky streak that runs in the Earp family. Waverly’s clearly developed because she is continually underestimated and therefore needs to speak up to get a word in edgewise, while Wynonna built her’s up as a shield against everything being thrown at her. The snark and sarcasm are often used to diffuse awkward situations – usually by making them even more awkward until someone gives up and walks out – and it adds a lot of humor to the show.

Overall, I really really enjoyed this one. Not only is it a win for female characters, it’s a win for diversity as a whole with its character backgrounds, sexuality, and even age. This show encompasses so many good things, and the plot and it’s execution across all 13 episodes of season one are fantastic to boot. I definitely recommend that you go watch it immediately so you won’t have too much catching up to do! The finale cliffhanger(s) are killer, and season two just started at the beginning of June on Syfy in the US, Space in Canada, and Spike in the UK.

 

HHC Rating: 5 Stars

Seriously Wicked – Tina Connolly

Source: Goodreads 

Camellia lives with a witch. Sarmine Scarabouche is not a particularly nice witch, evidenced by the fact that she tricked Camellia’s parents into giving her up when she was very little. Now Sarmine wants Camellia to learn magic and become as evil as she is, but Cam just wants to be a normal teenager. Then something horrible happens when Sarmine summons a demon, and Camellia will have to use everything she’s learned, about people, about magic, and most importantly about herself, to stop her world from crashing down around her.

Seriously Wicked is a brilliantly woven story. Every twist caught me by surprise, and Cam is a fantastically complex character. I love fantasy writing, and I’m always interested to see how authors bring magic into present day modern world scenarios without the use of time traveling or immortality themes. In this case, Connolly was able to incorporate beings such as dragons, demons, and phoenixes as well as witches into a modern world without attracting overly much attention, despite the odd ingredients needed for spells and so on. The characters are all very real, and despite the magic and mishaps, there is an underlying theme of normality that Cam is craving, and that Sarmine doesn’t know how to give to her. The whole dynamic between those two characters is so interesting that I could easily write a research paper on it.

The story is funny and captivating, and I couldn’t put it down. I hope Connolly eventually writes a sequel, but even if she doesn’t, this is a book I will probably read at least a few more times.

HHC Rating: 5 Stars