TV Review – Wynonna Earp, Season #1

Wynonna-Earp-Season-One-Syfy

Source: IMDB

Wynonna Earp has been running all her life. Hated by nearly everyone in her small town and thought to be off her rocker by the rest, she had no intention of ever returning to Purgatory. Brought home by the sudden and mysterious death of her uncle, Wynonna gets drawn into a quest for redemption that has been plaguing her family for decades.

 

First off, the diversity in this show is so SO good. Secondly, the number of strong female characters is pretty darn high and that rules. When it comes to the romances, the chemistry and build up isn’t always 100% there, but there is plenty of comical awkwardness to make up for it. I’m not a fan of zombies, but these zombie-esque monsters have been great so far. Even though it’s quite a gory show, it’s still fairly stomachable.

Wynonna, as the title character, is the focus of the show. However, there are plenty of cast regulars that hold their own and often have large storylines of their own. Wynonna’s kid sister, the black-ops agent sent to look into Purgatory’s strange occurrences, the local law enforcement, and even well-known historical characters are all well developed and intriguing to follow along their own paths that criss-cross Wynonna’s life.

To be honest, what I loved most about this show was the old-timey-western nods because I’m a fan of John Wayne and Clint Eastwood, but with the season finale, the show takes a turn towards decidedly more Syfy Channel material. I’m still not sure how I feel about it since it was all only in the finale, but I’m just not quite as excited to watch season two as I was season one.

Besides the old-west vibes, I really enjoyed the snarky streak that runs in the Earp family. Waverly’s clearly developed because she is continually underestimated and therefore needs to speak up to get a word in edgewise, while Wynonna built her’s up as a shield against everything being thrown at her. The snark and sarcasm are often used to diffuse awkward situations – usually by making them even more awkward until someone gives up and walks out – and it adds a lot of humor to the show.

Overall, I really really enjoyed this one. Not only is it a win for female characters, it’s a win for diversity as a whole with its character backgrounds, sexuality, and even age. This show encompasses so many good things, and the plot and it’s execution across all 13 episodes of season one are fantastic to boot. I definitely recommend that you go watch it immediately so you won’t have too much catching up to do! The finale cliffhanger(s) are killer, and season two just started at the beginning of June on Syfy in the US, Space in Canada, and Spike in the UK.

 

HHC Rating: 5 Stars

Seriously Wicked – Tina Connolly

Source: Goodreads 

Camellia lives with a witch. Sarmine Scarabouche is not a particularly nice witch, evidenced by the fact that she tricked Camellia’s parents into giving her up when she was very little. Now Sarmine wants Camellia to learn magic and become as evil as she is, but Cam just wants to be a normal teenager. Then something horrible happens when Sarmine summons a demon, and Camellia will have to use everything she’s learned, about people, about magic, and most importantly about herself, to stop her world from crashing down around her.

Seriously Wicked is a brilliantly woven story. Every twist caught me by surprise, and Cam is a fantastically complex character. I love fantasy writing, and I’m always interested to see how authors bring magic into present day modern world scenarios without the use of time traveling or immortality themes. In this case, Connolly was able to incorporate beings such as dragons, demons, and phoenixes as well as witches into a modern world without attracting overly much attention, despite the odd ingredients needed for spells and so on. The characters are all very real, and despite the magic and mishaps, there is an underlying theme of normality that Cam is craving, and that Sarmine doesn’t know how to give to her. The whole dynamic between those two characters is so interesting that I could easily write a research paper on it.

The story is funny and captivating, and I couldn’t put it down. I hope Connolly eventually writes a sequel, but even if she doesn’t, this is a book I will probably read at least a few more times.

HHC Rating: 5 Stars