On The Way To The Wedding (Bridgerton, #8) – Julia Quinn

Source: Goodreads

Gregory Bridgerton is the seventh of eight children, all of whom, aside from him, have married for love. So it’s no surprise that he believes in the all-consuming emotion. He just hasn’t found the right girl yet. He’s sure he hasn’t. He would know, right away, when the right person showed up. And then he does. A single glimpse and he’s lost. He’s found her. And yet, she couldn’t care less.

Lucy Abernathy doesn’t believe in love. She’s seen men lose their heads over her best friend so often that it has become almost funny. Practically engaged herself, she doesn’t mind when Hermione’s beaus ignore her existence, but it would be nice to be asked to dance on her own merit once in a while. Hermione claims to be in love with someone else, anyway, so the gentlemen are wasting their time, even if they don’t all give up so easily.

When Hermione has a sudden change of heart and finds herself in a true love-match, Lucy starts to look at things differently. She starts to wonder if she’s been missing something in front of her this whole time. Could love be real? Could she have it, if she took a chance? And what about being practically engaged?


The final installment in the saga of the Bridgerton family, On the Way to the Wedding, does not disappoint. Easily the most complicated of the series storylines, Gregory must adjust his own perspective before he can admit his true feelings, and he’ll have to face his worst fears to reach his happily ever after.

I always start this book a little sad. I know I’m at the end of the series once again, and I drag my feet because I don’t want it to end. The story also starts a little slow, because its complicated narrative requires it. So much happens in so little time, and our hero and heroine go through such drastic changes, face such strong obstacles, that the slow start is the only slow piece of the story.

Gregory, whom we’ve looked at primarily as a child for the duration of the series, is finally finding his footing as an adult, and his family gives him subtle and not so subtle nudges in the right direction. In any Bridgerton novel, the love story is always overlapped by the hero or heroine’s journey to find their place in the large family, and the youngest son is no different. The books are just as much about finding your place in the world as they are about settling down and finding the love of your life, and that is the strongest reason as to why I come back to this series again and again.

HHC Rating: 4.5 Stars.

Other reviews in this series:
Book 1 – The Duke And I
Book 2 – The Viscount Who Loved Me
Book 3 – An Offer From A Gentleman
Book 4 – Romancing Mister Bridgerton
Book 5 – To Sir Phillip, With Love
Book 6 – When He Was Wicked
Book 7 – It’s In His Kiss

It’s In His Kiss (Bridgerton, #7) – Julia Quinn

Source: Goodreads

Hyacinth Bridgerton may be the youngest of the Bridgerton clan, but she is far from the picture of refined elegance that her elder siblings garnered in the ballrooms of London. Hyacinth has been dealing professionally in gossip and intrigue since she was born. It’s no wonder, then, that her best friend in the world is the only woman in London able to speak her mind whenever she pleases: Lady Danbury. They have an appointment every Tuesday, where Hyacinth usually entertains the grandmotherly figure by reading the latest novel that they’ve come upon.

It is at one of these Tuesday appointments that Hyacinth makes the unfortunate acquaintance of Lady Danbury’s grandson, Gareth St. Clair. Gareth is a younger son forced into the position of heir, but still unable to escape his father’s ominous shadow. When he comes upon his only inheritance from his paternal grandmother, an old diary written in Italian, Gareth knows he will help to translate its contents and potentially locate her missing jewelry in order to rescue the St. Clair estates from his father’s clutches. Enter Hyacinth, who has less than a firm grasp of Italian, but is his maternal grandmother’s trusted friend, the exact kind of person Gareth himself is short on these days.

As Gareth and Hyacinth delve into Grandmother St. Clair’s diary and churn up the truth about Gareth’s past, the young man must also come to terms with his present and future, and decide if that future has space enough for Hyacinth, who is herself discovering what kind of woman she wants to become.

After the clump of books 4, 5, and 6 happening concurrently, it felt nice for time to pick back up to its normal pace again. Hyacinth has always been one of my favorite characters, as has Lady Danbury, and Gareth’s sarcasm and wit fit into the mix quite nicely. The rest of the Bridgertons orbited our hero and heroine well, and the twists and turns of the plot kept me guessing. Hyacinth is nothing if not the queen of mischief, so it was no surprise that she got up to all kinds of escapades in her own story. The hunt for the jewels and the addition of Italian as the language of choice for the diary really set this one apart. Once you’ve finished all of the Bridgerton novels, you’ll definitely want to check out The Bridgertons: Happily Ever After for even more fun with all of the couples – though Hyacinth’s final story will forever hold a special place filled with glee in my heart.

HHC Rating: 5 Stars.

Other reviews in this series:
Book 1 – The Duke And I
Book 2 – The Viscount Who Loved Me
Book 3 – An Offer From A Gentleman
Book 4 – Romancing Mister Bridgerton
Book 5 – To Sir Phillip, With Love
Book 6 – When He Was Wicked
Book 8 – On The Way To The Wedding

When He Was Wicked (Bridgerton, #6) – Julia Quinn

Source: Goodreads

Concurrent with the previous two books in the Bridgerton saga is Franchesca’s story. Although she is rarely mentioned and even more rarely seen in the previous novels, Francesca is a Bridgerton through and through. Married a few years before the start of this story, Franchesca is supremely happy with her husband, John Stirling, Earl of Kilmartin, and they are set to celebrate their anniversary when he dies suddenly. Left widowed, she turns to the new Earl, John’s cousin Michael, for support. Michael, however, feels suddenly that he must get away from Franchesca as well as John’s memory, and flees to India for three years.

As the years go by, Franchesca puts her time as the Countess of Kilmartin into running the estate in Michael’s place, but all the while she feels lonelier and lonelier. After three years, she happens to arrive in London for the season at the same moment that Michael returns from the continent, both of them ready to face the marriage mart. As they attempt to rekindle their friendship and navigate their way through the overcrowded ballrooms unexpected sparks begin to fly, and Franchesca finds herself running back to Scotland in the fear that she might dishonor John’s memory by reaching for the one thing she never thought she would find again: love.

I really wish we had focused a bit more on her first marriage, since John felt distant an unimportant, despite him being deeply involved in the storyline and the two main character’s lives. That being said, I quite enjoyed Colin’s interruptions of Michael’s quiet evenings, egging him on. We got to know both main characters pretty well despite Franchesca being a bit more of a loner than the rest of the Bridgertons, which explains her being rarely present in the previous books. Colin, Eloise, and Hyacinth are in nearly every book, meddling in their siblings affairs, but Franchesca operates almost entirely independent of her family. This book was mostly Franchesca and Michael insisting they could never do exactly what they were in the midst of doing, and people pointing out what they were doing, even while they denied it. The illness aspects of the book definitely helped move the plot along, but also detracted from potential character development.

I am always unsure how I feel about this one. On the one hand, I want more of Franchesca’s story. I need to understand her as a child, sharing a birthday with Eloise, in order to understand her as an adult. Maybe that is the problem I also had with the previous book. I needed more of a relationship between Eloise and Franchesca to understand Eloise.

HHC rating: 3.5 Stars.

Other Reviews in this Series:
Book 1 – The Duke and I
Book 2 – The Viscount Who Loved Me
Book 3 – An Offer From A Gentleman
Book 4 – Romancing Mister Bridgerton
Book 5 – To Sir Phillip, With Love
Book 7 – It’s In His Kiss
Book 8 – On The Way To The Wedding

To Sir Phillip, With Love (Bridgerton, #5) – Julia Quinn

Source: Goodreads

Eloise Bridgerton has had her fair share of marriage proposals and turned them all down. She wants a love match, as impossible as that seems. While she waits for love, she is content to participate in society, and write copious amounts of letters. Just as her best friend and favorite brother are falling for each other, Eloise accidentally starts falling for her cousin’s widowed husband. When he invites her to visit, she decides to go and see if they would suit… without informing her family. As Eloise and Phillip, and his twins Oliver and Amanda, attempt to get along in a house filled with sad memories, a reckoning is on the way in the form of all four, very large, Bridgerton brothers. Will the quiet Phillip be up to their standards? Will Eloise be in it for the long haul, or will the sadness of the past push her over the edge?


This one doesn’t have as much character development as I always hope it will. We get a much better sense of Eloise’s personality in the other books, when she is a secondary character, than when she is the main focus. As a heroine, she nearly disappears except in the presence of Oliver and Amanda. Sir Phillip is so wrapped up in what he wants out of a second wife that he barely notices her, and then suddenly realizes just how dependent on her he has become. I wish he had been able to appreciate her varied character a little more, and I wish she had spoken up a bit more often, rather than attempting to smother her outspokenness so as not to scare him off. She never smothered that aspect of her personality before, so why now? That aspect of the character, of her being incredibly insecure when we’ve known her to be sure and steadfast throughout the series throws me every time. The ending definitely redeems Phillip, but I do tend to be quite frustrated with him by that point.

*** Trigger Warning for themes of suicide in this one, folks ***

HHC Rating: 4 Stars.

Other reviews in this series:
Book 1 – The Duke And I
Book 2 – The Viscount Who Loved Me
Book 3 – An Offer From A Gentleman
Book 4 – Romancing Mister Bridgerton
Book 6 – When He Was Wicked
Book 7 – It’s In His Kiss
Book 8 – On The Way To The Wedding

Romancing Mister Bridgerton (Bridgerton, #4) – Julia Quinn

Source: Goodreads

Colin Bridgerton has always been the free spirit of the family. He’s traveled much of the known world, and he’s never given a thought to marriage. He arrives home from one of his adventures and runs into his brothers on his mother’s doorstep, where an argument ensues, pushing him to make the declaration that he will ‘never’ marry Penelope Featherington. To add to his misfortune, Penelope herself happens to just then be leaving his mother’s home.

Penelope has no plans for marriage. She and her best friend Eloise are going to settle somewhere together and live out their days in peace. Privately though, she’s always been a little bit in love with her best friend’s brother, Colin. The two of them have been friendly for years – Eloise is Colin’s favorite sister, and Penelope is the only non-family member he is comfortable being himself around, but the Featherington family is the silliest in London, and Penelope has always been a wallflower – dressed in colors that are always unflattering to her complexion.

When Colin finally gets up the courage to apologize to Penelope, he can see that something has changed, that their friendship is damaged, and that it is up to him to fix it. Yet, in setting out to heal his friendship with Penelope, Colin begins to realize how much, and just how little, he really knows about her. Add to their lives one of the quietest London Seasons in years and a plot to unmask the notorious Lady Whistledown, and Colin has his work cut out for him if he has any hope of keeping his newfound feelings under wraps.


If Kate and Anthony’s story is my favorite to read, then Penelope and Colin’s is my favorite to reflect upon. Romancing Mister Bridgerton is the fourth in an eight-book saga, and rounds out the marriages of the elder four Bridgertons. It also wraps up the Lady Whistledown story arc, and manages to occur nearly simultaneously with books five and six, which explore Eloise and Franchesca’s stories.

Watching Colin and Penelope try to find their equilibrium and rebuild their friendship while they wrestle with their feelings and their own personal disasters is, simply put, a work of art. There is a lot going on in this book, which can make it feel like it is flying by and also covering a wide range of characters. Because it is also setting up Eloise’s story, this book has a couple of chapters that are not told through Penelope or Colin’s eyes, and that adds another dash of mystery to what is already an enchanting story.

HHC Rating: 5 Stars.

Other reviews in this series:
Book 1 – The Duke And I
Book 2 – The Viscount Who Loved Me
Book 3 – An Offer From A Gentleman
Book 5 – To Sir Phillip, With Love
Book 6 – When He Was Wicked
Book 7 – It’s In His Kiss
Book 8 – On The Way To The Wedding

An Offer From A Gentleman (Bridgerton, #3) – Julia Quinn

Source: Goodreads

Sophie Beckett knows she is a bastard, but she is thankful every day that her father still decided to raise her as his own. After a magical evening spent sneaking into a masquerade ball and falling head-over-heels for a man she’s just met, Sophie is found out and flees her stepmother’s home, seeking employment with a kind couple in the country.

Years later, Benedict Bridgerton has no idea that Sophie is the same masked woman he fell for. The one woman he must let go of if he is ever going to be happy in a marriage. As the gentleman he was raised to be, coming to Sophie’s rescue is as natural as breathing. As their love blossoms again, Benedict struggles with his feelings for Sophie and for the masked woman he cannot find. Sophie, on the other hand, just wants to get away from London and the spies of her stepmother at all costs. When Sophie falls into her stepmother’s clutches, will Benedict be able to save her? Or will both of his loves be lost to him forever?


This would be a Cinderella retelling if Cinderella ran away and decided to make it on her own. This book had me on the edge of my seat the entire ride. Sophie is refreshingly independent, even if it means braving the great unknown that is an extremely dangerous place for a young unmarried woman. Benedict is striving to find meaning in his life, all the while attempting to put the masked woman out of his mind, and Sophie out of his mind, and find a willing and suitable wife. As his insecurities rise to the surface and Sophie tries to slip away, the tension rises, and the Bridgertons visit a prison.

This book really solidified my love for Lady Whistledown, as well. The mysterious gossip writer gets into the nitty-gritty with her sources in this one and it never fails to amuse me as a reader.

HHC Rating: 5 Stars.

Other reviews in this series:
Book 1 – The Duke And I
Book 2 – The Viscount Who Loved Me
Book 4 – Romancing Mister Bridgerton
Book 5 – To Sir Phillip, With Love
Book 6 – When He Was Wicked
Book 7 – It’s In His Kiss
Book 8 – On The Way To The Wedding

Top 10 Reads of 2018


Despite working full-time and attending graduate school, I managed to read 36 books in 2018. I’m pretty happy with that number given 16 of those were in October or later. I think this means I’m learning to balance everything a little bit better. The fact that I’m getting around to sharing them before May is a visible improvement as well. You all just got gift certificates to bookstores for the holidays, right? Now you have something to spend them on! In no particular order, here are my Top 10 Reads of 2018.

1 – Sorcery & Cecelia, or, The Enchanted Chocolate Pot – Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevermer
Magic is in the air in Regency England, and I am totally into it. Kate and Cece are two cousins whose narrative is told solely through letters written to each other. The escapades these two get into rival some romance novels and magical adventure novels. The letter format is a little strange to get used to, but once you’re in it, it blows you away.

2 – A Dark and Stormy Murder – Julia Buckley
A struggling writer is handed the opportunity of a lifetime when her best friend sets her up with a job as the assistant and ghostwriter to her favorite author of all time. Chaos ensues when someone shows up murdered on the property. Small towns, Gothic houses, lots of mystery and a dash of romance set this series in motion. Always a recipe for success in my book.

3 – The Secret – Julie Garwood
If your name is some variation of Julie/Julia, chances are I read and loved your book in 2018. This one takes a well-born British lady and drops her into the Scottish Highlands. Secrets and midwifery abound, as do hefty doses of rivalry and romance. No secret that this is one of my all time favorites, and my mom’s favorite as well. A review is forthcoming!

4 – Supergirl: Being Super – Mariko Tamaki, Illustrated by Joëlle Jones
Aside from the obvious parts of this origin story, I’d like to take a moment to truly appreciate the diversity in the town of Midvale. Sure, Kara still looks like the quintessential American cheerleader, but her friends and colleagues have varying appearances, making Midvale much more realistic than in past renderings.

5 – The Bear and The Nightingale – Katherine Arden
As if you all didn’t already know of my love for fairytale retellings, let this be a testament. The Winternight Trilogy features god-like sorcerers, dangerous winters in the Russian highlands, and one girl who is the key to peace between life and death, should she accept her fate… And she’s not sure she wants to.

6 – Geekerella – Ashley Poston
An absolutely wonderful Cinderella retelling, bringing together all of my favorite things: fairytales, Sci-Fi fandoms, and food.

7 – Ready Player One – Ernest Cline
Except for a strange sex-doll scene that I could have done without, this book was exceptional. The 80s references are all on-point, and I’m sure I even missed a few that I might catch in a re-read. While the movie was a totally different experience later in the year, the novel was a Sci-Fi and Game lovers dream.

8 – Virgin River – Robyn Carr
Small mountain town chock-full of retired marines, check. Old Doctor who needs a young assistant, check. The Virgin River series is different from others because it’s not just about the romances, but about rebuilding a town that has all but gone to seed. Each book builds on the businesses and townsfolk in a new twist on a constant front-running genre. A review is forthcoming.

9 – The Lido – Libby Page
I can’t get over how wonderful this book was. Showing loss, depression, and anxiety in a completely understandable and real way while depicting a town on the verge of community collapse, it rocked my socks. Libby Page is a debut author and I am already dying to read anything and everything else she is willing to write.

10 – The Viscount Who Loved Me – Julia Quinn
This may be the second book in a series, but it is undoubtedly my favorite in The Bridgerton Saga. The characters are so colorful and their actions are laugh-out-loud funny. Kate and Anthony are hands-down my favorite Bridgerton couple, and my face always hurts from smiling while I read this one.


What were some of your favorite reads in 2018? I’m always looking for great recommendations!


Other Best of the Year Lists:
Top 10 Reads of 2017